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Amoxicillina - Amoxil da Glaxo Smith Kline

Amoxicillina - Amoxil da Glaxo Smith Kline

Amoxicillin - Amoxil da GlaxoSmithKline UN'UNIT└ DI ORDINE INCLUDE: 18 capsulle, ciascuno contiene 50 mg mg PER CAPSULA: 50 mg TOTAL CAPSULES PER ONE...
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Amoxicillin Profile:

Amoxil is an antibiotic in the penicillin group of drugs. Amoxicillin fights bacteria in your body.

Amoxil is used to treat many different types of infections caused by bacteria, such as ear infections, bladder infections, pneumonia, gonorrhea, and E. coli or salmonella infection. Amoxil is also sometimes used together with another antibiotic called clarithromycin (Biaxin) to treat stomach ulcers caused by Helicobacter pylori infection. This combination is sometimes used with a stomach acid reducer called lansoprazole (Prevacid).

Do not stop taking Amoxicillin without checking first with your doctor.

Amoxicillin Dosing:

The dose of Amoxil will be different for different patients. Follow your doctor's orders or the directions on the label. The following information includes only the average doses of Amoxil. If your dose is different, do not change it unless your doctor tells you to do so.

The number of tablets that you take depends on the strength of the Amoxicillin.

Usual Adult Dose for Actinomycosis

500 mg orally 3 times a day or 875 mg orally twice a day for six months

Initial treatment of actinomycosis should include high dose parenteral penicillin G or ampicillin for 4 to 6 weeks, followed by appropriate oral therapy.

Usual Adult Dose for Anthrax Prophylaxis

500 mg orally every 8 hours

Oral amoxicillin is not considered first-line treatment for anthrax prophylaxis; it may, however, be used to complete a 60-day prophylactic course after 10 to 14 days of ciprofloxacin or doxycycline in pregnant or lactating patients or in patients with contraindications to the other two agents. The total duration of antimicrobial therapy is 60 days.

Usual Adult Dose for Cutaneous Bacillus anthracis

Treatment for confirmed cases of cutaneous Bacillus anthracis infection: 500 mg orally three times a day

Oral amoxicillin is not considered first-line treatment for the treatment of cutaneous anthrax; it may, however, be used to complete the treatment course once clinical response to ciprofloxacin or doxycycline has been observed or if the patient has contraindications to the other two agents. The total duration of antimicrobial therapy is 60 days.

Usual Adult Dose for Bacterial Endocarditis Prophylaxis

2 g orally given one hour prior to the procedure

Amoxicillin is considered the standard agent for prophylaxis against bacterial endocarditis in at-risk individuals undergoing certain dental, oral, respiratory tract or esophageal procedures.

Amoxicillin is not appropriate as endocarditis prophylaxis for patients identified as high-risk, including those with prosthetic heart valves, prior endocarditis, and those who have had surgically constructed systemic shunts or conduits. These patients should receive appropriate parenteral antimicrobial therapy.

Usual Adult Dose for Chlamydia Infection

500 mg orally 3 times a day for 7 days in pregnant patients as an alternative to erythromycin in macrolide-sensitive individuals

Amoxicillin does not have reliable activity against Chlamydia trachomatis.

Usual Adult Dose for Cystitis

250 to 500 mg orally 3 times a day for 3 to 7 days; alternatively, 500 to 875 mg orally twice a day may be administered

Usual Adult Dose for Urinary Tract Infection

250 to 500 mg orally 3 times a day for 3 to 7 days; alternatively, 500 to 875 mg orally twice a day may be administered

Usual Adult Dose for Helicobacter pylori Infection

1 g orally 2 to 3 times a day for 14 days

Amoxicillin is used in combination with metronidazole and bismuth subsalicylate or with clarithromycin and a proton-pump inhibitor such as omeprazole or lansoprazole.

Usual Adult Dose for Lyme Disease - Arthritis

500 mg orally 3 times a day for 14 to 30 days

Early Lyme disease is often treated with an oral antibiotic such as doxycycline, cefuroxime or azithromycin, all of which are active against Borrelia burgdorferi. If amoxicillin is used, clinicians may wish to add probenecid, although the benefit of this addition is uncertain.

Up to 15% of patients with Lyme disease experience the Jarisch-Herxheimer reaction (increased fever, increased flushing rash, and increased pain) during the first 24 hours of therapy. This reaction is self-limiting, does not necessarily reflect true allergy to amoxicillin, and may be reduced in intensity by premedication with aspirin and/or prednisone.

Usual Adult Dose for Lyme Disease - Carditis

500 mg orally 3 times a day for 14 to 30 days

Early Lyme disease is often treated with an oral antibiotic such as doxycycline, cefuroxime or azithromycin, all of which are active against Borrelia burgdorferi. If amoxicillin is used, clinicians may wish to add probenecid, although the benefit of this addition is uncertain.

Up to 15% of patients with Lyme disease experience the Jarisch-Herxheimer reaction (increased fever, increased flushing rash, and increased pain) during the first 24 hours of therapy. This reaction is self-limiting, does not necessarily reflect true allergy to amoxicillin, and may be reduced in intensity by premedication with aspirin and/or prednisone.

Usual Adult Dose for Lyme Disease - Erythema Chronicum Migrans

500 mg orally 3 times a day for 14 to 30 days

Early Lyme disease is often treated with an oral antibiotic such as doxycycline, cefuroxime or azithromycin, all of which are active against Borrelia burgdorferi. If amoxicillin is used, clinicians may wish to add probenecid, although the benefit of this addition is uncertain.

Up to 15% of patients with Lyme disease experience the Jarisch-Herxheimer reaction (increased fever, increased flushing rash, and increased pain) during the first 24 hours of therapy. This reaction is self-limiting, does not necessarily reflect true allergy to amoxicillin, and may be reduced in intensity by premedication with aspirin and/or prednisone.

Usual Adult Dose for Lyme Disease - Neurologic

500 mg orally 3 times a day for 14 to 30 days

Early Lyme disease is often treated with an oral antibiotic such as doxycycline, cefuroxime or azithromycin, all of which are active against Borrelia burgdorferi. If amoxicillin is used, clinicians may wish to add probenecid, although the benefit of this addition is uncertain.

Up to 15% of patients with Lyme disease experience the Jarisch-Herxheimer reaction (increased fever, increased flushing rash, and increased pain) during the first 24 hours of therapy. This reaction is self-limiting, does not necessarily reflect true allergy to amoxicillin, and may be reduced in intensity by premedication with aspirin and/or prednisone.

Usual Adult Dose for Otitis Media

250 to 500 mg orally 3 times a day for 10 to 14 days; alternatively, 500 to 875 mg orally twice a day may be administered

Usual Adult Dose for Pneumonia

500 mg orally 3 times a day or 875 mg orally twice a day may be administered for 7 to 10 days if pneumococcal pneumonia is suspected

Only mild pneumonia due to pneumococcus should be treated with amoxicillin.

Usual Adult Dose for Sinusitis

250 to 500 mg orally 3 times a day for 10 to 14 days; alternatively, 500 to 875 mg orally twice a day may be administered

Longer courses of therapy, up to 3 or 4 weeks, may be required in refractory or recurrent cases.

Usual Adult Dose for Skin or Soft Tissue Infection

250 to 500 mg orally 3 times a day for 7 to 10 days; alternatively, 500 to 875 mg orally twice a day may be administered

Usual Adult Dose for Upper Respiratory Tract Infection

250 to 500 mg orally 3 times a day for 7 to 10 days; alternatively, 500 to 875 mg orally twice a day may be administered

Usual Adult Dose for Bronchitis

250 to 500 mg orally 3 times a day for 7 to 10 days; alternatively, 500 to 875 mg orally twice a day may be administered

Usual Adult Dose for Tonsillitis/Pharyngitis

Immediate-release: 250 to 500 mg orally 3 times a day for 7 to 10 days; alternatively, 500 to 875 mg orally twice a day may be administered

Extended-release: 775 mg orally once a day within 1 hour after a meal for 10 days; for infections secondary to Streptococcus pyogenes

Usual Adult Dose for Bacterial Infection

250 to 500 mg orally 3 times a day for 7 to 21 days; alternatively, 500 to 875 mg orally twice a day may be administered

Usual Pediatric Dose for Bacterial Endocarditis Prophylaxis

50 mg/kg orally as a single dose 1 hour prior to procedure

Amoxicillin is not appropriate as endocarditis prophylaxis for patients identified as high-risk, including those with prosthetic heart valves, prior endocarditis, and those who have had surgically constructed systemic shunts or conduits. These patients should receive appropriate parenteral antimicrobial therapy.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Anthrax Prophylaxis

80 mg/kg/day divided into equal doses administered orally every 8 hours

Maximum dose: 500 mg/dose

Oral amoxicillin is not considered first-line treatment for anthrax prophylaxis; it may, however, be used to complete a 60-day prophylactic course after 10 to 14 days of ciprofloxacin or doxycycline in pediatric patients. The total duration of antimicrobial therapy is 60 days.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Cutaneous Bacillus anthracis

Treatment for confirmed cases of cutaneous Bacillus anthracis infection: 80 mg/kg/day divided into equal doses administered orally every 8 hours

Maximum dose: 500 mg/dose

Oral amoxicillin is not considered first-line treatment for the treatment of cutaneous anthrax; it may, however, be used to complete the treatment course once clinical response to ciprofloxacin or doxycycline has been observed. The total duration of antimicrobial therapy is 60 days.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Otitis Media

4 weeks to 3 months: 20 to 30 mg/kg/day in divided doses every 12 hours

4 months to 12 years: 20 to 50 mg/kg/day in divided doses every 8 to 12 hours; acute otitis media due to highly resistant strains of Streptococcus pneumonia may require doses of 80 to 90 mg/kg/day orally divided into 2 equal doses 12 hours apart

Usual Pediatric Dose for Skin or Soft Tissue Infection

4 weeks to 3 months: 20 to 30 mg/kg/day in divided doses every 12 hours

4 months to 12 years: 20 to 50 mg/kg/day in divided doses every 8 to 12 hours; acute otitis media due to highly resistant strains of Streptococcus pneumonia may require doses of 80 to 90 mg/kg/day orally divided into 2 equal doses 12 hours apart

Usual Pediatric Dose for Urinary Tract Infection

4 weeks to 3 months: 20 to 30 mg/kg/day in divided doses every 12 hours

4 months to 12 years: 20 to 50 mg/kg/day in divided doses every 8 to 12 hours; acute otitis media due to highly resistant strains of Streptococcus pneumonia may require doses of 80 to 90 mg/kg/day orally divided into 2 equal doses 12 hours apart

Usual Pediatric Dose for Pneumonia

40 to 50 mg/kg/day orally in divided doses every 8 hours

Usual Pediatric Dose for Tonsillitis/Pharyngitis

4 weeks to 3 months: 20 to 30 mg/kg/day in divided doses every 12 hours

4 months to 12 years: 20 to 50 mg/kg/day in divided doses every 8 to 12 hour

12 years or older:

Immediate-release: 250 to 500 mg orally 3 times a day for 7 to 10 days; alternatively, 500 to 875 mg orally twice a day may be administered

Extended-release: 775 mg orally once a day within 1 hour after a meal for 10 days; for infections secondary to S pyogenes

Missed dose of Amoxicillin:

If you are using Amoxil regularly and you miss a dose, use it as soon as possible. Then use any remaining doses for that day at regularly spaced intervals. Do not double doses.

Storage - To store Amoxicillin:

  • Keep out of the reach of children.
  • Store away from heat and direct light.
  • Do not store in the bathroom, near the kitchen sink, or in other damp places. Heat or moisture may cause the medicine to break down.
  • Keep the medicine from freezing. Do not refrigerate.
  • Do not keep outdated medicine or medicine no longer needed. Be sure that any discarded medicine is out of the reach of children.

Amoxicillin Side effects:

All medicines may cause side effects, but many people have no, or minor, side effects.

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

Fever, sore throat, and headache with a severe blistering, peeling, and red skin rash; nausea, stomach pain, low fever, loss of appetite, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes); diarrhea that is watery or bloody; fever, chills, body aches, flu symptoms; easy bruising or bleeding, unusual weakness; urinating less than usual or not at all; agitation, confusion, unusual thoughts or behavior; seizure (black-out or convulsions)

Less serious Amoxil side effects are more likely to occur, such as:

Nausea, vomiting, stomach pain; vaginal itching or discharge; headache; swollen, black, or "hairy" tongue; thrush (white patches inside your mouth or throat)

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Tell your doctor about any unusual or bothersome side effect.